March 17, 2014

San Francisco radio station Latino Mix 105.7 has been playing Nelly’s “Hot in Herre” on a continuous loop since Friday, March 14, 2014 at 3 p.m.

The loop ends Monday at 5 p.m. when the station makes the switch to Hot 105.7 (see what they did there?).

But first the internet got PUMPED about it.

Read this Radio Insight piece about the story and how ”the stunt has proven that live radio can still be a viral medium.”

Sidenote: This happened in Toronto this summer when new station Indie 88 Rickrolled the radio, playing Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” over and over to test its signal. (Except I’d argue Indie 88’s is a one-up, since it took an internet meme and used it on the radio. It’s a neat contra-flow, from the newest medium to the oldest comparable medium.)

March 12, 2014

WNYC’s new mobile app lets you build playlists based on interests and play radio underground.

The underground feature is great for subway commuters (though not revolutionary — I  use my Stitcher app underground, so long as the show loads before I head underground). 

But the more important part is customizing based on interests. I’m always looking for new radio, and a tool that allows interest-based discovery IN the listening platform is important. 

Kudos WNYC.

January 20, 2014
"A study conducted at San Vittore prison in Milan, Italy, found that ‘in a place where privacy is constantly denied, radio becomes a vital tool for building and maintaining one’s private self.’ Some inmates even had a term for using their radio to create a bubble of personal space: ‘I headphone myself,’ one said."

The iPod of Prison in the New Yorker

November 14, 2013
"40,000 hours of radio and television content is being digitized for long-term preservation at the library. It will become the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and will be housed at the library’s National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in underground vaults in Culpeper, Va."

Tons of old public radio and TV is getting the archive treatment

November 7, 2013
Happy birthday, American public broadcasting!
ourpresidents:



“At its best, public television would help make our Nation a replica of the old Greek marketplace, where public affairs took place in view of all the citizens.”
-President Lyndon B. Johnson

On this day in 1967, LBJ signed the Public Broadcasting Act (S.1160).
Photo: President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks prior to the signing in the East Room of the White House.  November 7, 1967.
Read the full remarks at the American Presidency Project.
-from the LBJ Library

Happy birthday, American public broadcasting!

ourpresidents:

“At its best, public television would help make our Nation a replica of the old Greek marketplace, where public affairs took place in view of all the citizens.”

-President Lyndon B. Johnson

On this day in 1967, LBJ signed the Public Broadcasting Act (S.1160).

Photo: President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks prior to the signing in the East Room of the White House.  November 7, 1967.

Read the full remarks at the American Presidency Project.

-from the LBJ Library

(via broadcastarchive-umd)

September 14, 2013
"We’re having our best year ever"

A look at how small town radio stations in Indiana are thriving by going back to basics like remotes from car dealerships and locally hosted shows.

Source: AP

September 5, 2013
"Three times every weekday (and twice on Saturdays) people in western Arkansas call in to KARV’s “Dial-A-Trade,” an audio adaptation of the classified ads. For an hour or so, callers explain what they’re looking to buy, sell or trade. Then they leave their phone numbers. On live air. For free."

— A tale of how radio is used in rural Arkansas, a place where only 1 in 5 people have internet connections, according to this Associated Press story. (Source)

March 17, 2013
Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
To honour the land of my family and my birth, let’s look at the first radio broadcasts in the Irish Free State.
The Irish public broadcaster, now called RTÉ (Raidió Teilifís Éireann), first broadcast on January 1, 1926. You can hear that first broadcast on RTÉ’s website. It’s a neat clip, despite being rather crackly, and in Irish. The broadcast features Douglas Hyde, the future President of Ireland and a scholar of the Irish language. 
Then listen to Jimmy Mahon talk about his experiences in the early days of Irish radio. 
"We had an amplifier, a huge bloomin’ thing… We had to hire a microphone if we had anything special. We had to hire a microphone from Standard Telephones. An inspector had to go for that, they wouldn’t give it to the ordinary Joe."
Then have a Guinness! (Or at least have a pack of Tayto and some Cadbury Buttons.)

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

To honour the land of my family and my birth, let’s look at the first radio broadcasts in the Irish Free State.

The Irish public broadcaster, now called RTÉ (Raidió Teilifís Éireann), first broadcast on January 1, 1926. You can hear that first broadcast on RTÉ’s website. It’s a neat clip, despite being rather crackly, and in Irish. The broadcast features Douglas Hyde, the future President of Ireland and a scholar of the Irish language. 

Then listen to Jimmy Mahon talk about his experiences in the early days of Irish radio. 

"We had an amplifier, a huge bloomin’ thing… We had to hire a microphone if we had anything special. We had to hire a microphone from Standard Telephones. An inspector had to go for that, they wouldn’t give it to the ordinary Joe."

Then have a Guinness! (Or at least have a pack of Tayto and some Cadbury Buttons.)

February 20, 2013

Have you guys seen Pontypool?

It’s a Canadian zombie movie set in a small-town Ontario radio station. And it’s as great as that sounds. (Which is really great!)

February 19, 2013
This is the big, weird, wild, awesome building in Paris designed by Henry Bernard to house public broadcaster Radio France.
Film-maker Nicolas Philibert is releasing a documentary about the ins and outs of Radio France and the people who work there, appropriately titled La Maison de la Radio.
See some stills from the movie here
Read Variety’s review here
Listen to Radio France here

This is the big, weird, wild, awesome building in Paris designed by Henry Bernard to house public broadcaster Radio France.

Film-maker Nicolas Philibert is releasing a documentary about the ins and outs of Radio France and the people who work there, appropriately titled La Maison de la Radio.

See some stills from the movie here

Read Variety’s review here

Listen to Radio France here